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Freddie King - My Feeling For The Blues (1970) Reissue 1992

Posted By: Designol
Freddie King - My Feeling For The Blues (1970) Reissue 1992

Freddie King - My Feeling For The Blues (1970) Reissue 1992
EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 219 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 96 Mb | Scans included
Modern Electric Blues, Texas Blues | Label: Cotillion/Atlantic | # 7 90352-2 | 00:36:02

The mid-to-late Sixties was a strange and difficult time for many Blues men - most were without contracts, forgotten and under-appreciated. Then the Blues boom happened (particularly in the UK) and many had their careers kick-started all over again. Freddie King was no exception. His last album had been for Federal in 1964, but with a new lease of life on the mighty Atlantic label, he produced two much revered LPs in rapid succession. The first was "Freddie King Is A Blues Master" released in 1969 on SD 9004 - and then this peach - "My Feeling For The Blues" on Cotillion SD 9016 released in early 1970.

Freddie King, Albert King, Earl King - We Three Kings Of Blues Guitar (2013)

Posted By: Designol
Freddie King, Albert King, Earl King - We Three Kings Of Blues Guitar (2013)

Freddie King, Albert King, Earl King - We Three Kings Of Blues Guitar (2013)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 320 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 125 Mb | Scans included | 00:50:40
Electric Blues, Modern Electric Blues, Rhythm & Blues | Label: Fuel | # 302 061 993 2

Curious, isn't it, how some of the greatest guitarists in post-war Blues history all shared the same regal surname? And entirely fitting. Freddie, Albert, and Earl King royally ruled the Blues kingdom with their brilliant innovations and seminal licks. All of them greatly impacted the Rock field as well. Eric Clapton cites Freddie as a major influence, while Stevie Ray Vaughan was an Albert acolyte. Jimi Hendrix did a dynamite version of Earl's 'Let The Good Times Roll.' These three kings of the electric Blues guitar played a mammoth role in defining the sound of post-war Blues guitar. Their influence remains monumental to this day.

Freddy King - Blues Guitar Hero: The Influential Early Sessions (1993) [Re-Up]

Posted By: Designol
Freddy King - Blues Guitar Hero: The Influential Early Sessions (1993) [Re-Up]

Freddy King - Blues Guitar Hero: The Influential Early Sessions (1993)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 396 Mb | Scans included | Time: 01:08:59
Electric Texas Blues, Modern Electric Blues | Label: Ace | # CDCHD 454

Of the Three 'Kings' of the blues (BB, Albert and Freddy), Freddy King is perhaps the least well known these days. He enjoyed cross-over success with the white rock audiences of the 70s (hitting with albums for Cotillion, RSO and Shelter and touring extensively - his 'live' LP for German label Crosscut is about the closest thing to heavy metal blues imaginable). Yet his death from hepatitis in 1976 robbed Freddy of the kind of acclaim that the current blues revival has given BB, Albert and John Lee Hooker. There was a time, though, in the mid-'60s when his singles were among the most influential in blues, particularly for British and European audiences. His instrumental singles Hideaway and Drivin' Sideways were issued on Sue and covered by every white blues group that knew what was really happening on the R&B scene.

Freddie King - The Texas Cannonball (1972) [DCC Expanded Remastered by Steve Hoffman, 1991] Re-Up

Posted By: Designol
Freddie King - The Texas Cannonball (1972) [DCC Expanded Remastered by Steve Hoffman, 1991] Re-Up

Freddie King - The Texas Cannonball (1972)
Compiled & Remastered By Steve Hoffman, 1991
EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 462 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 184 Mb | Scans included | 01:16:43
Modern Electric Blues, Texas Blues | Label: DCC Compact Classics, Shelter | # SRZ-8018

Similar to his first Shelter outing (Getting Ready), but with more of a rock feel. That's due as much to the material as the production. Besides covering tunes by Jimmy Rogers, Howlin' Wolf, and Elmore James, King tackles compositions by Leon Russell and, more unexpectedly, Bill Withers, Isaac Hayes-David Porter, and John Fogerty (whose "Lodi" is reworked into "Lowdown in Lodi"). King's own pen remained virtually in retirement, as he wrote only one of the album's tracks.