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Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace & Music (1970) Director's Cut

Posted By: Mindsnatcher
Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace & Music (1970) Director's Cut

Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace & Music (1970)
Ultimate Collector's Edition | Director's Cut
Full Blu-ray | m2ts | AVC @ 48.0 Mbps, 23.967 fps | 1920 x 1080 | 03:44:19 | 37 GB (Including Extras)
Audio 1: English AC-3/ TrueHD 5.1 @ 2772 Kbps, 48.0 KHz | Audio 2: English AC-3 5.1 @ 640 Kbps |
Subtitle: English, Spanish, Finnish, Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese, French, Danish, Italian, Korean, German, Polish, Norwegian
Director: Michael Wadleigh | Stars: Joan Baez, Richie Havens, Roger Daltrey | Country: USA
Genre: Documentary, History, Music


Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace & Music (1970) Director's Cut
Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace & Music (1970) Director's Cut
Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace & Music (1970) Director's Cut
Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace & Music (1970) Director's Cut
Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace & Music (1970) Director's Cut
Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace & Music (1970) Director's Cut
Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace & Music (1970) Director's Cut
Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace & Music (1970) Director's Cut


Developed and directed by Michael Wadleigh, edited by assistant directors Thelma Schoonmaker and Martin Scorsese (then a twenty-six-year old fledgling still four years away from Mean Streets), and filmed on location from August 15 to August 18, 1969, Woodstock represents documentary filmmaking at its finest. It may have been completely misunderstood by studio executives of the era, but it went on to earn a variety of nominations and awards (most notably an Oscar for Best Documentary Feature), receive official recognition from the National Film Registry, and build a loyal following of fans young and old. Over the course of the monumental, now-historically important event, Wadleigh's cameras bounce and drift across the Sullivan County grounds, focusing on the hundreds of thousands attending the festival as intently as the legendary performance artists occupying the main stage. More intriguingly, each passing face in the crowd promises to tell a story we're never given the opportunity to hear: Wadleigh's film is about the experience, not the individual... his is a production of spirit and fervor, not of biographies and destinations. He treats Woodstock as if it were an enormous, ever-evolving beast swarming with parasites intent on taking as much as they're afforded. His interest lies in dissecting the hippie subculture through candid footage, voyeuristic establishing shots, and lingering close-ups, not psychological analysis. But its Wadleigh's editors, having tirelessly sifted through more than 365,000 feet of film, who bring his vision to startling life. The screen splits into two and three panels at a time, offering juxtaposed imagery and observational photography, often to the seeming delight of his subjects. Drug addicts and nudists alike freely flaunt their wares to a cold and nonjudgmental camera, singers and guitarists are bathed in a deluge of light and sound, and friends and lovers lose themselves in a throng of strangers. Both a staggering disconnect and an unbreakable bond develops between each and every person that appears on screen; they're oblivious to the fleeting and superficial nature of their love, yet they share a commonality beyond description. Therein lies the power of Wadleigh's Woodstock. As a documentary, it effortlessly captures the atmosphere of the festival without resorting to sentimentality or forgettable rhetoric. As a piece of art, it evokes the very emotions and feelings its subjects are experiencing. As a film, it offers countless characters amidst crisis, each one falling victim to the same delusion: that the rest of the world has stopped, ever so briefly, to share in their respite from the harsh realities of life. They seem all-too-ignorant of the very things they renounce, and resoundingly guilty of the naivety they reject. And the stage performances? Absolutely electrifying. Each band gives their all, embracing the swaying Bethel audience as if it were their last. I'm sure a lot of it has to do with the copious amounts of drugs freely circulating the concert, but the singers and musicians seem as genuinely enraptured by the event as everyone attending. There's a raw, unfettered undercurrent to the performances that feels as tangible today as I imagine it did forty years ago. Even though I'm a relative pup myself (born too late for Woodstock, but just in time for Star Wars), digging through Wadleigh's documentary answered every question I've ever had about why so many people were drawn to Bethel... why so many considered the festival their generation's defining moment. While I would never have the stomach for such an event -- watching young people squander their lives on idealism, heroine, and tree-line trysts is disturbing at times, disquieting at others -- I can see why so many men and women, frustrated with a war in Vietnam and haunted by a persistent cultural disconnect, would find three days on a muddy hillside with more than four-hundred thousand people so fulfilling. Perhaps that's what makes Woodstock such a special film: it doesn't merely document a three-day music festival, it transports viewers into the experience and allows them to examine it up close and from afar. Can we really ask for more? In addition to the mammoth 224-minute cut of the film, the Blu-ray edition of Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace & Music comes packaged in an elaborate 40th Anniversary Collector's Edition Box, includes a slew of goodies, and boasts a generous collection of regular and exclusive special features. The bundle itself is both attractive and sturdy (albeit a bit complicated when you first dig in): after you disregard the plastic retail sleeve, the faux-deerskin shell (with removable iron-on patch) is a nostalgic sight to behold. From there, you'll find a lightweight box tucked snuggly inside that houses a standard-sized Blu-ray case, a weighty lenticular lucite display piece, a small 60-page reprint of an issue of LIFE Magazine, a concert fact sheet, reproductions of handwritten notes, a three-day ticket, and a handy envelope to hold it all together. The box will appeal to enthusiasts who have plenty of room on their shelves and casual fans interested in shedding the set's excess baggage in favor of the standard Blu-ray case buried inside. •Woodstock: From Festival to Feature (SD, 77 minutes): First up is an extensive series of featurettes and mini-docs that explore the festival, the crowd, the rain, the documentary, the cameras and production techniques used, the studio's interaction with the filmmakers, and a variety of other topics. Watch individual segments or use the "Play All" option to plow through everything in one big chunk. •Untold Stories (SD, 143 minutes): An excellent collection of eighteen bonus performances worth the price of admission alone. Treat yourself to Joan Baez singing "One Day at a Time" (4:17), Country Joe McDonald's "Flying High" (2:21), Santana's "Evil Ways" (3:56), Canned Heat's "I'm Her Man" (5.33) and "On the Road Again" (10.49), Mountain's "Beside the Sea" (3:38) and "Southbound Train" (6:17), The Grateful Dead's "Turn on Your Love Life" (37:44), The Who's "We're Not Going to Take It" (9:07) and "My Generation" (7:36), Jefferson Airplane's "3/5 of a Mile in 10 Seconds" (5:40), Joe Cocker's "Something's Coming On" (4:14), Johnny Winter's "Mean Town Blues" (10:52), Paul Butterfield's "Morning Sunrise" (8:26), and Sha Na Na's "Teen Angel" (3:21), and Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Born on the Bayou" (5:12), "I've Put a Spell On You" (4:10), and "Keep on Chooglin" (9:25). •Exclusive! Customizable Playlist: Users can create their own custom playlist for the eighteen bonus performances included in the set. •Festival Opening and Closing (SD, 5 minutes): A series of scenes and shots that didn't make it into the Director's Cut of the film. •The Story of the Sixties & Woodstock (SD, 5 minutes): A short promo for the Museum at Bethel Woods. •Exclusive! My WB Commentary: BD-Live users can record, post, and share their own Picture- in-Picture video commentary with the online WB community. •Exclusive! Live Community Screening: This interactive BD-Live option allows users to send invitations, host virtual screenings, and chat with other viewers while watching the film. •Exclusive! Media Center: Warner's BD-Live hub allows users to download additional content, photo galleries, trailers, and other special features. As an added incentive, Amazon.com has packed 20-minutes of exclusive bonus performances onto the set's second disc. While the online outlet previously reported their exclusive version would be a 3-disc set, they've since corrected their listing and clarified the manner in which their exclusive content is being made available. Also note that other stores (Target among them) are apparently offering their own unique exclusive content as well.

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